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Indiana hospitals work with limited Pfizer supply; health officials say hope on


INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — In Gov. Eric Holcomb’s weekly COVID-19 briefing, Chief Medical Officer Dr. Lindsay Weaver announced a hospital in northern Indiana received its first shipment of the Moderna vaccine on Monday.

Indianapolis could have it as soon as Wednesday.

State health officials said since the start of the pandemic, hospitals have been working off projections. This means some hospitals prepared for a certain number of doses and ended up with fewer.

Now with two vaccines to work with, they hope to fill some of the gap.

More than 40,000 Hoosiers have been vaccinated so far, and 50,000 more are on a list to receive their first dose by Jan. 4. Weaver said the vaccine would be a scarce resource for a very long time.

“We received a total of 55,000 Pfizer doses on Friday, and yesterday received an additional 39,000 and so we know we have over 400,000 health care providers in Indiana, so we are not where we need to be,” said Weaver.

With Moderna coming soon, she does think the state will be in a much better position very soon.

Right now, the plan is for Moderna to go directly to long-term care facilities. At that point the state will begin vaccinating patients and get to staff who haven’t been able to get into hospitals for their first dose.

Weaver expects that process to begin on Dec. 28.

“Once we get through these holidays and we get consistent shipments of the vaccines, we’ll be able to fall into a better steady state, where all of our hospitals will know how much of the vaccine they have and so that we can get those appointments filled and scheduled in a timely manner,” said Weaver.

State health officials also said on Tuesday, the number of people in Indiana who want the vaccine is rising. They shared data from a recent survey that found 57% of Hoosiers would get the vaccine, and 34% said they were unsure.

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Indiana coronavirus timeline

With information from the Indiana Department of Health through Dec. 21, this timeline reflects updated tallies of deaths and positive tests prior to that date.

  • March 6: Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) confirms the first case in Indiana. Officials say the Marion County resident had recently traveled to Boston to attend a BioGen conference as a contractor.
  • March 8: ISDH confirms a second case. An adult in Hendricks County who had also traveled to the BioGen conference was placed in isolation. Noblesville Schools say a parent and that parent’s children will be self-quarantining after attending an out-of-state event where someone else tested positive.
  • March 9: Avon Community School Corp. says a student on March 8 tested positive.
  • March 10: ISDH launches an online tracker. Ball State University basketball fans learn the Mid-American Conference tourney will have no fans in the stands. Three businesses operating nursing homes in Indiana announce they will no longer allow visitors.
  • March 11: The Indianapolis-based NCAA announces the Final Four basketball tournaments will be conducted with essential staff and limited family attendance. The Big Ten announces all sports events, including the men’s basketball tournament at Bankers Life Fieldhouse, will have no fans starting March 12. Ball State University suspends in-person classes the rest of the spring semester. NBA suspends all games, including the Indiana Pacers, until further notice. Butler University and the University of Indianapolis extend spring break, after which they will have virtual classes.
  • March 12: Gov. Eric Holcomb announces new protections that led to extended public school closings and the cancellation of large events across the state. The NCAA cancels its basketball tournaments. The Big Ten suspends all sporting events through the winter and spring seasons. The league including the Indy Fuel hockey team suspends its season. Indy Eleven says it will reschedule four matches. Indianapolis’ annual St….



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